Today is Friday, September 21, 2018 When Is Your Testing Date?

ASVAB Test – Critical Basics To Get Your Best Score

The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB test) is an aptitude exam given by the military for applicants seeking admission into the armed forces such as Army, Air Force, Marines and Navy. The ASVAB test is administered nationwide at schools as part of the Career Exploration Program, Military Entrance Processing Stations (MEPS) and Military Entrance Test sites (MET), and has been given to over 40 million applicants.

Links To FREE ASVAB Test Prep Strategies And Solutions

The following ASVAB test preparation ‘blueprints for success’ provide resourcecs that help you pass the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery quicker and in less time…

Why You Should Take The ASVAB Test

The ASVAB test is the official exam that’s given to applicants who are contemplating a career in the military. No matter which military branch you want to join, it’s required by all military branches that you achieve a minimum pass score. It’s important to view this military exam as more than just a standardized exam; a high score can allow you to enjoy better enlistment and employment opportunities in the armed forces. The information below gives you a clear focus for your ASVAB test prep.

Go to: ASVAB Quick Cheat-Sheet now.

The ASVAB (Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery) exam is a multiple-aptitude test that measures a candidate’s potential for success in the military. Recruiters use this test information to determine your employment opportunities, or if you qualify for full or partial tuition scholarship should you enroll in the ROTC.

The Minimum Score For Military Branches

Applicants who take the ASVAB are asked by recruiters to mark down ten job choices that they may fulfill when enlisted into a specific military branch. A high ASVAB score could play a role in helping applicants secure their top job choices, as they’ve shown themselves to be highly qualified candidates.

Taking Steps To The ASVAB

An applicant must speak with a recruiter before taking the exam, as the recruiter will need to determine that you fulfill basic requirements. These may include the following:

  • Your marital status
  • Your health
  • Your education
  • Your drug use
  • Your criminal history

Applicants should answer the recruiters’ questions honestly, as these basic qualification questions are critical for determining occupational success in the U.S. Armed Forces. After answering these questions, your recruiter will schedule you to take the ASVAB, as well as a physical exam.

Applicants will take the exam at one of many ASVAB locations. Most applicants will take the exam at a Military Entrance Processing Stations (MEPS), or at a Military Entrance Test Site (MET), a satellite location site designed to accommodate applicants who do not live MEPS.

Please note that the ASVAB is not available in any other language. There is no fee to take this exam.

Your ASVAB Score And Your Military Career

The main ASVAB score is known as the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT), which military branches use to determine eligibility for enlistment. This score is a combination of the applicant’s Arithmetic Reasoning, Math Knowledge, and Verbal Composite scores, multiplied by two.

It’s important for applicants to note that each specific military branch has a minimum ASVAB score that must be achieved to be considered for enlistment. These service branches and their relevant AFQT scores are as follows:

  • ASVAB for Army: 31
  • ASVAB for Navy: 35
  • ASVAB for Marines: 31
  • ASVAB for Air Force: 36
  • ASVAB for Coast Guard: 45

Your ASVAB scores on other test sections can help recruiters determine your enlistment and employment opportunities. Applicants who score highly on the ASVAB and in school as well may be eligible for ROTC scholarships. This is an ideal benefit for applicants who wish to become officers, as this prestigious position requires a four-year college degree.

Taking the ASVAB doesn’t commit you to the military; however, it can help you decide how successful you’ll be in a job position within the U.S. Armed Forces.

The United States military has high standards and applicants must do well to gain admission. ASVAB testing is comprised of 10 exams. Four subsets of the ASVAB exams are used for Armed Forces Qualifying Test (AFQT) which will determine if a candidate can enter the military. The goal of the ASVAB test is to determine if candidates have the mental aptitude to enlist and to place them in an occupational specialty, in which they can excel.

Therefore, it’s critical you get the best ASVAB practice test questions and ASVAB study guides as possible. Statistics in a recent military study found you increase your ASVAB score between 2-5% for each additional book you use in your test preparation.

Go to: How to Get The ASVAB Score You Need for the best preparation materials (by real soldiers who passed).

ASVAB Test Registration

In order to apply to take the ASVAB, applicants must contact a military recruiter who will pre-screen candidates. The recruiter will register those candidates who meet the requirements. The average military recruiter is between 25 and 30 years old and has served in the military from 5 to 10 years.

ASVAB Test Center Expectations

All of the testing locations will require the applicant to provide valid identification on arrival. It is best to plan to arrive early because candidates who are late you may not be allowed to take the exam.

Understanding The Structure And Format Of The ASVAB Exam

  • The ASVAB test is offered in a computer based format at MEPS locations while the paper based version is provided at Military Entrance Test sites (MET) located throughout the United States. Applicants can choose either format.
  • The paper based ASVAB test allows applicants to review previous answers whereas the computer version does not.
  • The computer based exam is adaptive, meaning that the computer adapts to the test takers skill level by adjusting the difficulty of the questions based on the candidates performance. If the previous question was answered correctly, the next question will be harder whereas if the previous question was answered incorrectly the next question will be easier.
  • The all of the ASVAB tests are comprised of multiple choice questions, with four possible options.
  • The AFQT test evaluates four areas: Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension and Mathematics Knowledge. It measures an applicant’s strengths and weaknesses and opportunities for success in the future.
  • The number of ASVAB test questions asked in each component of the test is listed below and vary depending on whether you are taking the paper of computer based format.

ASVAB Subtests Number of Questions

The pencil-and-paper version of this exam consists of 225 questions, will take 149 minutes to complete, and can be broken down into the following parts:

  • General Science (GS; 25 questions; 11-minute time limit)
  • Arithmetic Reasoning (AR; 30 questions; 36-minute time limit)
  • Word Knowledge (WK; 35 questions; 11-minute time limit)
  • Paragraph Comprehension (PC; 15 questions; 13-minute time limit)
  • Mathematics Knowledge (MK; 25 questions; 24-minute time limit)
  • Electronics Information (EI; 20 questions; 9-minute time limit)
  • Auto and Shop Information (AS; 25 questions; 11-minute time limit)
  • Mechanical Comprehension (MC; 25 questions; 19-minute time limit)
  • Assembling Objects (AO; 25 questions; 15-minute time limit).

The computerized version of the ASVAB (CAT-ASVAB) can be broken down as follows:

  • General Science (GS; 16 questions; 8-minute time limit)
  • Arithmetic Reasoning (AR; 16 questions; 39-minute time limit)
  • Word Knowledge (WK; 16 questions; 8-minute time limit)
  • Paragraph Comprehension (PC; 11 questions; 22-minute time limit)
  • Mathematics Knowledge (MK; 16 questions; 20-minute time limit)
  • Electronics Information (EI; 16 questions; 8-minute time limit)
  • Auto and Shop Information (AS; 22 questions; 13-minute time limit)
  • Mechanical Comprehension (MC; 16 questions; 20-minute time limit)
  • Assembling Objects (AO; 16 questions; 16-minute time limit).

Most applicants complete the questions before the time allotted has run out. On average, the paper based ASVAB test takes about 3 hours to complete whereas the computerized test takes about 1 ½ hours to complete.

It is best not to guess on the ASVAB as there are penalties for wrong answers.

How To Interpret Your ASVAB Score

  • In most cases the ASVAB test score is given to the recruiter several days after the test. The minimum required scores for the ASVAB differ depending on the area of Military Occupational Specialty (MOS).
  • The passing grade needed on the AFQT also differs across branches of service and is reported as a percentile that ranges between 1 and 99. However a score of 50 or more may entitle the applicant to incentives.
  • If you fail and need to retake the ASVAB exam, you must wait for one calendar month. If you need to retest a second time, you must wait for two months.

Candidates should use an effective ASVAB practice test. The higher the score, the more career opportunities will be available.

Go to: Little Tricks and Pointers That Helped Me Score High On The ASVAB Test right now.

De-bunking The Mystery Of The ASVAB Score

The Armed Forces Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) exam is an aptitude test that’s used to determine an applicant’s eligibility to serve in the U.S. Armed Forces. The ASVAB score has a shroud of mystery around it, and for good reason. Although this military exam has up to ten subtests, there are multiple scores that are used by recruiters to determine a person’s abilities and future military career. This is why applicants often struggle with understanding the the scoring. It’s difficult to determine a coherent score breakdown.

Use the information below as a ASVAB test prep study guide for better understanding how your skills and aptitudes are measured on this standardized test.

To de-bunk the mystery of how the ASVAB is scored, the following includes a breakdown of the exam, a score breakdown, minimum standards for each military branch, and how many questions applicants should answer.

The Paper And Pencil Version Of The ASVAB

Your ASVAB score can be influenced by which type of exam you take: the paper and pencil version, or the computer version. While 70% of administered ASVAB exams are taken on the computer, the paper and pencil version is still a popular option for test-takers.

Applicants will be tested on nine subtests, each of which has it’s own number of questions and time limits. The paper and pencil version can be broken down as follows:

  • General Science (GS). This subtest has 25 questions and a time limit of 11 minutes.
  • Arithmetic Reasoning (AR). This subtest has 30 questions and a time limit of 36 minutes.
  • Word Knowledge (WK). This subtest has 35 questions and a time limit of 11 minutes.
  • Paragraph Comprehension (PC). This subtest has 15 questions and a time limit of 13 minutes.
  • Mathematics Knowledge (MK). This subtest has 25 questions and a time limit of 24 minutes.
  • Electronics Information (EI). This subtest has 20 questions and a time limit of nine minutes.
  • Auto and Shop Information (AS). This subtest has 25 questions and a time limit of eleven minutes.
  • Mechanical Comprehension (MC). This subtest has 25 questions and a time limit of 19 minutes.
  • Assembling Objects (AO). This subtest has 25 questions and a time limit of 15 minutes.

Applicants taking the pencil-and-paper version of this exam will answer 225 questions, which should take them approximately 149 minutes to complete.

The Computer Version Of The ASVAB Applicants taking the computer version of the ASVAB test can anticipate answering a total of 145 questions in a time limit of 154 minutes or less. This military exam can be broken down into nine subtests, which are as follows:

  • General Science (GS). This subtest has 16 questions and a time limit of eight minutes.
  • Arithmetic Reasoning (AR). This subtest has 16 questions and a time limit of 39 minutes.
  • Word Knowledge (WK). This subtest has 16 questions and a time limit of eight minutes.
  • Paragraph Comprehension (PC). This subtest has 11 questions and a time limit of 22 minutes.
  • Mathematics Knowledge (MK). This subtest has 16 questions and a time limit of 20 minutes.
  • Electronics Information (EI). This subtest has 16 questions and a time limit of eight minutes.
  • Auto and Shop Information (AS). This subtest has 22 questions and a time limit of thirteen minutes.
  • Mechanical Comprehension (MC). This subtest has 16 questions and a time limit of 20 minutes.
  • Assembling Objects (AO). This subtest has 16 questions and a time limit of 25 minutes.
The Minimum Score For Military Branches

In order for an applicant to be enlisted into the military, he or she must achieve a minimum AFQT score for a specific branch. The Armed Forces Qualification Test is the main ASVAB score that’s comprised of an applicant’s Arithmetic Reasoning, Math Knowledge, and Verbal Composite scores, which are added together then multiplied by two. Each branch of the U.S. Armed Forces has a minimum AFQT score:

  • ASVAB scores for Army: 31
  • ASVAB scores for Navy: 35
  • ASVAB scores for Marines: 31
  • ASVAB scores for Air Force: 36
  • ASVAB scores for Coast Guard: 45
The Importance Of The ASVAB Score

While applicants should strive to achieve the minimum AFQT score for their desired military branch, it’s critical to understand how a higher overall ASVAB score can help open enlistment and employment opportunities. Applicants who have higher test scores often receive their top vocational picks in the military, and some may even be eligible for ROTC scholarships. If you plan on becoming an officer, a high ASVAB score can make it easier for you to achieve your goals.

The importance of your ASVAB score cannot be understated; therefore, ensure that you arm yourself with the best test information and preparation for the available.


Check-out: How To Score Your Highest, Get The Military Enlistment And Perks You Deserve Now

  • Click On Orange Button Above For Free 'Insider' ASVAB Report