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De-bunking The Mystery Of The ASVAB Score

The Armed Forces Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) exam is an aptitude test that’s used to determine an applicant’s eligibility to serve in the U.S. Armed Forces. The ASVAB score has a shroud of mystery around it, and for good reason. Although this military exam has up to ten subtests, there are multiple scores that are used by recruiters to determine a person’s abilities and future military career. This is why applicants often struggle with understanding the the scoring. It’s difficult to determine a coherent score breakdown.

Use the information below as an ASVAB study guide for better understanding how your skills and aptitudes are measured on this standardized test.

To de-bunk the mystery of how the ASVAB is scored, the following includes a breakdown of the exam, a score breakdown, minimum standards for each military branch, and how many questions applicants should answer.

The Paper And Pencil Version Of The ASVAB

Your ASVAB score can be influenced by which type of exam you take: the paper and pencil version, or the computer version. While 70% of administered ASVAB exams are taken on the computer, the paper and pencil version is still a popular option for test-takers.

Applicants will be tested on nine subtests, each of which has it’s own number of questions and time limits. The paper and pencil version can be broken down as follows:
  • General Science (GS). This subtest has 25 questions and a time limit of 11 minutes.
  • Arithmetic Reasoning (AR). This subtest has 30 questions and a time limit of 36 minutes.
  • Word Knowledge (WK). This subtest has 35 questions and a time limit of 11 minutes.
  • Paragraph Comprehension (PC). This subtest has 15 questions and a time limit of 13 minutes.
  • Mathematics Knowledge (MK). This subtest has 25 questions and a time limit of 24 minutes.
  • Electronics Information (EI). This subtest has 20 questions and a time limit of nine minutes.
  • Auto and Shop Information (AS). This subtest has 25 questions and a time limit of eleven minutes.
  • Mechanical Comprehension (MC). This subtest has 25 questions and a time limit of 19 minutes.
  • Assembling Objects (AO). This subtest has 25 questions and a time limit of 15 minutes.
Applicants taking the pencil-and-paper version of this exam will answer 225 questions, which should take them approximately 149 minutes to complete.

The Computer Version Of The ASVAB

Applicants taking the computer version of the ASVAB test can anticipate answering a total of 145 questions in a time limit of 154 minutes or less. This military exam can be broken down into nine subtests, which are as follows:
  • General Science (GS). This subtest has 16 questions and a time limit of eight minutes.
  • Arithmetic Reasoning (AR). This subtest has 16 questions and a time limit of 39 minutes.
  • Word Knowledge (WK). This subtest has 16 questions and a time limit of eight minutes.
  • Paragraph Comprehension (PC). This subtest has 11 questions and a time limit of 22 minutes.
  • Mathematics Knowledge (MK). This subtest has 16 questions and a time limit of 20 minutes.
  • Electronics Information (EI). This subtest has 16 questions and a time limit of eight minutes.
  • Auto and Shop Information (AS). This subtest has 22 questions and a time limit of thirteen minutes.
  • Mechanical Comprehension (MC). This subtest has 16 questions and a time limit of 20 minutes.
  • Assembling Objects (AO). This subtest has 16 questions and a time limit of 25 minutes.

The Minimum Score For Military Branches

In order for an applicant to be enlisted into the military, he or she must achieve a minimum AFQT score for a specific branch. The Armed Forces Qualification Test is the main ASVAB score that’s comprised of an applicant’s Arithmetic Reasoning, Math Knowledge, and Verbal Composite scores, which are added together then multiplied by two. Each branch of the U.S. Armed Forces has a minimum AFQT score:
  • ASVAB scores for Army: 31
  • ASVAB scores for Navy: 35
  • ASVAB scores for Marines: 31
  • ASVAB scores for Air Force: 36
  • ASVAB scores for Coast Guard: 45

The Importance Of The ASVAB Score

While applicants should strive to achieve the minimum AFQT score for their desired military branch, it’s critical to understand how a higher overall ASVAB score can help open enlistment and employment opportunities. Applicants who have higher test scores often receive their top vocational picks in the military, and some may even be eligible for ROTC scholarships. If you plan on becoming an officer, a high ASVAB score can make it easier for you to achieve your goals.

The importance of your ASVAB score cannot be understated; therefore, ensure that you arm yourself with the best test information and preparation for the available.

Check-out: How To Score Your Highest, Get The Military Enlistment And Perks You Deserve Now